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Telescopic contact lens: Another sci-fi gadget becomes reality

NewsOKJComment
Telescopic contact lens: Another sci-fi gadget becomes reality
This is the latest version of the telescopic contact lens, with a quarter for scale. / Photo Credit: Eric Tremblay and Joe Ford. Courtesy of EPFL.

This is the latest version of the telescopic contact lens, with a quarter for scale. / Photo Credit: Eric Tremblay and Joe Ford. Courtesy of EPFL.

I recently watched the over-the-top awesome film, "Kingsman: The Service Service", a nostalgic throwback to the Sean Connery era of James Bond films.

Apart from the suits and comedic exchange of clever words and gentleman's fists, one aspect that always stood out for me were the gadgets available at the protagonist's disposal to, in every case, to save the world.

If you watch "Kingsman: The Secret Service", or any other spy films for that instance, you should be quite familiar with a spy's eyewear.

A standard piece of spy eyewear prescription does more than correct his vision. It allows him to search for information, look through walls and even (uh.. ahem..) clothes.

In "Kingsman: The Secret Service", one gadget used was contact lens that gave the user magnified vision. Coincidentally, on the week of the film's premiere, optics specialist Eric Tremblay from EPFL in Switzerland updated members of the AAAS Annual Meeting in San Jose, California on his telescopic contact lens.

With the capability of providing 2.8 times magnified vision, Eric hopes his invention will help an estimated 285 million visually impaired people worldwide, especially the community suffering from Age-related Mucular Degeneration (AMD).

First unveiled in 2013, the telescopic contact lens had went through critical improvements to make it more comfortable and safe to use in our ever so sensitive eyes.

Not a fan of contact lens? Eric Tremblay had also unveiled glasses of the same zooming capability, which the users can toggle between normal and magnified vision by just a wink.

Once only possible in sci-fi movies, the telescopic contact lens and glasses may soon be on a path similar to the GPS device - a gadget that was once only available to the most devilishly handsome spy on the silver screen but had since become available to everyone with an internet connection.

What spy gadget will you want to be made for consumers by the end of this decade?